Not for Profits and Blogging

I recently volunteered to set up a blog and website for a local church and during the process it occurred to me that all kinds of non-profit organizations could benefit from a blog. Not just churches, but Scout groups, local charities, community organizations and clubs, even schools can benefit. Here are five reasons not-for-profits should have a blog.

Communicate with members: You would think that with cellphones and other mobile devices it would be easy to communicate with anyone, but everybody’s so busy these days. With a blog you can post any message you want, any time of the day or night, and all your members will be notified of upcoming events, schedule changes, calls for volunteers, or even just your daily news.

And it’s even more effective if all your members join your email list or subscribe to your RSS feeds. No more excuses that they didn’t get your call.

Announce special projects to the community: Use your blog to let members of the community know when your organization is holding an open meeting or hosting a dance or planting new trees in the park. Every non-profit needs the support of their local community.

Attract new members: Every non-profit always needs new members, too, but existing members are usually too tied up with other duties to go out recruiting. And generally, the only time they think about it is when they’re actually at a meeting. If you’re blogging about all the exciting things you have going on, word gets out all over the Internet.

Raise funds: We put a “Donation” button on the church blog I set up but you can use a blog to raise funds in any number of ways. Sell a recording of your Choir singing Christmas carols. Put together a collection of your club’s favorite recipes. Get an Amazon affiliate link and tell your members to use your link when they’re shopping.

Increase credibility: The one thing that all non-profit organizations have in common in the need for transparency and credibility. With a blog you can publicize your fund raising results and what you used those funds for so people can see you’re trustworthy.

You can also include email contact forms and phone numbers for your Board of Directors, or even every member of your organization if you want, so people who are thinking about donating can see the names and faces behind the organization. If you live in a small town where everybody knows everybody else, this personalization can go a long way toward increasing credibility.

Flyers get blown away and newspaper ads don’t get read anymore. And let’s face it, you’ve probably already seen how hard it is to track people down using the phone or snail mail. Everybody’s online these days, sharing information on their Facebook pages. If you’re involved in a not-for-profit organization and you set up a blog, they could all be sharing information about you.

Stéphane Kerwer
Article written by Stéphane Kerwer (1995 Posts)
Bonjour from a french guy. My name is Sté Kerwer and Dukeo is my blog. I do most of the heavy lifting in here but from time to time, you may see some guest posts. To receive updates from Dukeo, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.
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3 Comments (Add one)

  1. REKHILESH ADIYERI
    REKHILESH ADIYERI

    An informative post for a blogger like me.I’m really interested to read more from you ste, :)

  2. Chuck Bartok

    One of our Client started blogging (at our “encouragement”) two years ago and have experienced huge surge in their donation subscriptions.
    Of course they heavily share on Social Media. Their Facebook page now has over 10,000 engaged fans

  3. David Crowley

    Good points! We have found regular blogging important to our nonprofit, Social Capital Inc. We have an overall organizational site blog, which is especially important for positioning us as a leader in our field–relates to your credibility point. We have local sites for the communities we serve that are especially important for communicating about event and volunteer opportunities.