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Blog Structure: Should You Create A New Blog For Each Topic?

Steven One response Blogging

You’ve probably noticed a new trend in blogging. Blogs seem to be getting bigger, covering a broader range of topics, and some even have multiple contributors handling all the content. You may even be tempted to open up your own blog to some new, exciting content, but you’re worried: Which is better – One blog with many categories, or many blogs that play it close to the vest? No surprise here. My answer is: It depends.

Many Relevant Categories

Keep in mind the traffic you already have coming in and the traffic you’re targeting. If you’re planning to add additional categories that will be relevant to that traffic you’ll probably be OK.

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Before you add those new categories though, take a look at the categories you already have. There’s really no ideal number, but too many can be confusing for your readers. Use your main keywords to title your categories and use tags to further define your content.

Many Non-Relevant Categories

Adding new, non-relevant categories is a different story. As soon as you add that first non-relevant blog post, new traffic is going to start coming to your blog. If they like what they see, they’re going to look around for more of the same. Since the bulk of your content is about something totally unrelated, they’re not going to be interested.

You also have to consider your existing traffic. They’re going to see that new content, too, and wonder what the heck is going on. Of course, you could explain in a blog post that you’re just exploring new territory, but that really won’t help. Your readers are following your blog for one reason, and one reason only.

There are times when a variety of categories on a single blog will work. Freelance writers and authors often blog about a wide variety of topics because they use their blog to showcase writing samples. But in most cases it’s best to base your blog around one central theme or topic.

Many Blogs

The alternative, then, is to set up multiple blogs to handle non-related content but that presents problems, too. Now you have multiple blogs to manage and you have to produce content for all of those blogs. If your goal is to build a blogging empire, then go for it, but understand what’s involved before you start buying up domain names.

Alternatives To Multiple Blogs

Personally, I think blogging is fun, and it’s only natural to want to write about something that piques your interest, even if it’s not relevant to your blog. But if you don’t plan to churn out enough content on this new topic to turn it into a full-blown blog, consider publishing it somewhere else.

For example, you could set up a Squidoo account and start a new Lens each time you want to write about something different. Or, once you’ve written your interesting article, send it around to some relevant blogs and submit it as a guest post. If you have enough content, you could even turn it into a small ebook and sell it at Amazon. Sometimes you don’t even need to think about the idea of one blog or many blogs, sometimes you can make money without “blogging” at all.

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One Comment

  1. If you have a hobby blog where you just write about what you are thinking or doing, then I think you can write about whatever you want. If you have a business blog where you are targeting a particular audience, then I agree with you, you need to keep it relatively close to topic.

    I can see possibly addressing a different topic if you can make it completely relevant to your existing audience. If you have a blog about how to start a blog you might be able write something on self-confidence as it relates to getting over your fear of getting that first post published.

    In general though, you should stick close to topic.

    I remember creating a few lenses on Squidoo many years ago. It looks like it has been absorbed into HubPages now though. The URL redirects.